Tag Archives: cucumber plants

THE CONCLUSION OF THE SICK CUCUMBERS

Long weekends are a wonderful invention. In the future, we see a world that revolves around them. When only the best of the best survive, long weekends will rise victorious.

Do you want to know what will not last until the end of time? These cucumbers.

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With the case of the sick cucumbers solved, it was time to deal with the aftermath. Since there was a chance the plants could have had an infection from bug bite weakness, we decided to pull the plants up and dispose of them in a bag, instead of tilling the nutrients into the soil. We cut off the vines, pulled up the roots, and then wrestled them and some of the surrounding mulch into a lawn bag.

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After everything was cleared away, we poured a little soil activator on the dirt, to help strengthen it, and covered it with some leftover straw.

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Once our other veggies are done for the summer, we have some plans to mix up our garden configuration. Think more than just a row of garden beds, but less than a tomato plant labyrinth.

THE CASE OF THE SICK CUCUMBERS

Something got to our cucumber plants. We hired a private detective garden gnome to solve the mystery, but he is falling short of expectations. We had a suspicion the perpetrator was a bug, but our detective said the evidence is still in the lab.

Since we are now in the hottest time of the year, not much is wanting to grow anymore, but we would at least like them to have the option, if they feel so inclined. This cucumber stopped growing about a month ago.

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At first, we blamed this bug. Its black. Its red. Kinda evil looking. We have since learned that it is actually a lady bug larvae, which hasn’t formed its more eye-pleasing lady body.

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The plant would grow leaves and flowers, but then they would crinkle up and die. We grew these cucumbers from little baby seeds, so it was heartbreaking to watch them suffer.

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Not ones to stand idly by, we went rouge and did some inspecting of our own. Here is our evidence:

  • Mottled leaves
  • Deformed leaves and flowers
  • Deformed and discolored cucumbers

From the data, we deduce that the attacker was (maybe): Thrips

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Thrips are tiny bugs that feed on flowers and vegetables, causing discoloration, deformities, and disease spread. They are also one of the fastest growing invasive species groups, gaining strength from our plants on their path to world domination.

And with that, our dreams of pickles lay shattered on the floor like glass jars. Stay tuned for a follow-up post where we bag up our broken dreams and dead plants, and prepare to start anew.